Richard Stephens of North Elmsley, brother of Winnifred Stevens/Stephens

I have just discovered through my AncestryDNA matches that a common ancestor Richard Stephens (b. Oct 10, 1805, Mayo, Ireland* to be confirmed) is, in fact, my 4rth great-granduncle, brother to my 4rth great-grandmother, Winnifred Stevens/Stephens (b. Mar 1802 Ireland), which gives her a family of origin and possibly a location!

I wrote about Winnifred earlier in Winnifred Stevens / Stephens 1802, where I included this photo recently provided by DNA relative Scott Moore:

Winnifred Stevens 1800 of Maberly, Ont., provided by Scott Hansen Moore of U.S., descendent of David Moore, 4rth cousin, Familysearch.org https://www.familysearch.org/tree/pedigree/portrait/L268-KGP

Winnifred Stevens (1800), wife of William Moore

Winnifred’s brother Richard Stephens lived in North Elmsley, and died accidentally, tragically in the 1860s. More on him coming soon…

Published in: on December 23, 2019 at 2:27 pm  Leave a Comment  

DNA Update on Native Blood from Mary Beaton, Newfoundland

A very quick update on my DNA results in my mother’s family line from Newfoundland, regarding Mary Beaton, our 5th/6th great grandmother. My uncle tested positive for Native American (more accurately, Canadian-Mi’kmaq) blood on 23andme (an American test), as well as another of my mother’s cousins from the same line (different sibling), all descendants of Mary Beaton.

The trace percentage is consistent with the number of generations to my mother, uncle and cousin (5-6 generations from Mary Beaton, b. around 1800 on Burnt Island, Exploits, Nfld, Canada). Both 23andme and AncestryDNA change their DNA compositions frequently, so a trace percentage can appear and disappear with each rendition.

However, this evidence is good enough for me. Especially when there is no guarantee of inheriting any of the native DNA; that they did shows the legend is founded on truth: my 6th great grandmother Mary Beaton was indigenous, Mi’Maq, and her DNA carried through all the way down to my mother’s generation, however trace.

(I don’t think my mother needed this evidence, as her nature is so close to the land, the trees, the water, that once I had a dream that her spirit name was “Peacewater”).

The second proof of native blood is the book River Lords* that includes Mary Beaton’s son’s comments on his mother’s Mi’kmaq origin, and how she worked at the house of Captain Peyton alongside the last Beothuk, Shanawdidhit.  Please see previous post for more information. Here is a possible picture of Mary Beaton (left) and Shanawdidhit (right), both born around 1800 in the same area, Exploits River, Newfoundland.

What also surprised me about my Uncle’s DNA results were the 8.6% Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France; 0.7% Portuguese; and trace 0.1% North African (with a matching DNA relative in Morocco) – but that’s another story!

*Book ref: Amy Louise Peyton. River Lords, Father and Son: The Story of the Peytons and the River Exploits, 2nd ed. St. John’s, NL: Flanker Press, 2005, ISBN 1-894463-51-X.

 

Published in: on December 22, 2019 at 4:54 am  Leave a Comment  
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My Irish Blood

After many years of searching for my Irish ancestry, I have many names, but fewer places. Without visiting Ireland, and connecting with flesh and blood relatives here and abroad, my trail grows stale.

It’s time to be Irish, and not pursue.

Ireland explains my poetic, lyrical nature, my love of Celtic music, my father’s wicked sense of humour, my flash of temper, good looks (hey!), and dreamy love of the coastal worlds and spirit worlds, the “thin places” of my homeland within. I can’t escape it. It is as near to me as my nose!

Rather than try to find my Irish roots, I am becoming them. Claiming my inner and outer reality, not by DNA, not by the relatives I have found, nor the hypothetical places I have traced with my hand on a screen leaning over books too long. No, Ireland has been with me all along.

images

My heart sings and my imagination dreams,

The romantic singer, free bourne spirit leaping and dancing

The marvellous look on my face when you’ve struck my last nerve

The sound of my feet on the ground, the way they don’t quite touch 

As I am always “somewhere else” eyes far off 

Sounds, plays, movies, foods, music, laughter, cabins in the wood

Stone houses alongside craggy lanes

It’s all me

I haven’t changed a bit!

I will find you one day

Like a dog chasing its tail!

You are mine, you are the beating of my mind and heart

My love of nourishing soul food in teary conversation

Lost in each other’s bright faces

Life! a parade of sparkling waywardness

That always leads me home

Loving, laughing, feeling, smiling,

Tapping, mimicking, greeting, hugging,

Spilling a mug or two

A jig, a halt, a saunter, a milieu

Pubs and sea food

Black ale known as stout and hearty stew

I may eat veg but my soul goes back to the earth  

The fire and the salt and the sweet smell of the hearth

Ah God, you are my distant refuge, and as near as a dear friend to me.

 

Published in: on December 22, 2019 at 4:15 am  Leave a Comment  
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Connecting Moores of Maberly, Drummond, North Elmsley, Carleton Place (Lanark County, Ontario)

Based on a comment submitted to this site, Thatsrelative, by Janet Moore, I’ve realized a connection that binds two Moore branches together: the Moores of Maberly/Perth area, and those of Drummond/N. Elmsley and other related towns in Lanark County, Ontario.

I’ve often wondered about the relation of Thomas Buell Moore (b. Nov 18 1833, Drummond, Ontario). He owned the Tayside cheese factory in 1894 (as per Perth Courier). This establishment employed one or more of my Moores.  Also, Mr Thomas B. Moore was Township clerk in 1899 (Perth Courier), another occupation shared with my 3rd great-grandfather Thomas Moore, Esq.(b. abt. 1829 Ireland) of Maberly, who was also Reeve of the Township.

Further research of these families shows that Mr Thomas B. Moore comes from a long line stretching back to Antrim Ireland and also earlier settlers of Massachusetts. My Moore origin is still elusive, though our closest match is Dundonald, Down, Ireland, near Belfast, which is shared with Antrim.

Another family, the Garretts, connect our Moore branches together very nicely and seem to be very close friends. Both families worked together and even married to each other. For example, our Winnifred Stephens/Stevens (b. Mar 1802 Ireland), my 4rth great-grandmother was widowed in the 1850s and remarried a Thomas Garrett (b. Jan 1791 England). This Thomas Garrett’s 2d great-grandaughter Viola Garrett (b. 1893 Ontario) married Kenneth Charles Moore (b. 1900) from this same line of Moores (son of James Samuel Moore (b. 1828 Garrison, Lachine Quebec), son of George William Moore (b. 1780s Furlough, Tullyniskan, Antrim, Ireland as per a family record).

Did you catch all that? It’s not easy to string these families together, but at some point, you have to notice the connections and make inferences. We may not have the pieces all put together, but there seems to be a clear connection binding these families socially if not by blood. Time will tell, and my guess is, DNA will confirm many cousins binding the Moore families of Lanark County (Canada), Ireland and the U.S. once and for all.

 

Herb Moore Carleton Place from Frances Moore bytown.net

Herbert James Moore of Carleton Place photo credit: Frances Moore of the website http://www.bytown.net/moorefamilybyfrances.htm.  The picture is of Herbert James Moore (b. 1888 Ontario), son of James Samuel Moore (b. 1863 North Elmsley) who was the son of the same name, James Samuel Moore (b. 1828 Garrison, Lachine, Quebec), whose father was George William Moore (Antrim).

 

 

 

Royal Blood – The White Queen

Kind of a misnomer, really (royal), as most of us in Europe and the West have descended from some royal line, somewhere, usually due to some “illegitimate” son or daughter best hidden and remaining outside the “realm” until DNA or excellent genealogy uncovers the wayward seed.

Well, here we are in the 21st century when the wayward Lancaster and York roses of the 15th century and beyond were cast into the countryside, and on board ships, and off to the New World. And here I am, one of the little sprouts that dared live outside the bounds of religious or political order. A wayward daughter (myself) who sprung from a Queen who is mostly unknown, and was never a royal in the first place!

Elizabeth Woodville wife of King Edward III

Elizabeth Woodville

Queen Consort to King Edward IV (her second marriage)

  My 17th Great Grandmother (to many thousands)

b.1437 – d. 1492

Elizabeth Woodville (Wydville), the mostly obscure “White Queen” of  author Phillipa Gregory’s novels and televised miniseries, originally a commoner, married John Grey of Groby (from whom I spring), who died during the battle at St. Albans for the Lancaster side. At a chance meeting on the road, King Edward IV, a Yorkist, fell in the love with Elizabeth when she pleaded to keep her land; he was so transfixed, he married her secretly in 1464, to the detriment of his own reign.

The Cousins War or “War of the Roses” continued to rage on, and after the death of King Edward IV (natural causes), her son ascended as Edward V only to be killed; she was displaced and her two younger royal sons removed and murdered in the Tower of London by the King’s ambitious brother, Richard, who later became King Richard III, later to be thwarted by the first Tudor King Henry VII.

Elizabeth exhibited bravery and some cunning as well, to protect her lands, and to enrich the lives of her many relations who benefited greatly from her increase in stature.   She survived the changing of the guard and the many tragedies in that violent time, retiring as a dowager queen at Bermondsey Abbey, where she died in 1492.

Due to the discovery of Richard III’s bones, and a DNA sample, many are now finding a direct relation to his family, mine not included. I am on the other side of that history, the Woodville and Grey family who also have fascinating histories (including Sir Thomas Grey, 1st Marquis of Dorset, a relation of Lady Jane Grey who was beheaded later down the road by King Henry VIII, a distant cousin), and Elizabeth Woodville’s mother, Jacquetta of Luxembourg, “Lady Rivers” who was accused of witchcraft and apparently descended from a water deity (mermaid) named “Melusine” (who also entranced a man and became a woman; hence, the modern fable, The Little Mermaid!).

Quite a heritage for a little known queen.

Did I stumble upon this through my DNA? No, I inherited this story accidentally, having dusted through my family tree far back enough to piece together the past 17 generations to arrive in utter amazement at this unknown queen.

Elizabeth Woodville, my 17th Great Grandmother…

What does this mean? Not a thing. But fascinating nonetheless! Of course, I have to give her the credit for my stubborn assumption that I must have had royal blood somewhere, to justify my aversion to physical labour and my joy of leisure – not that she had any! I will take my obscure modern life, any day.

 

Elizabeth Woodville; Queen Consort to Edward IV of England (1437 – 1492)
17th great-grandmother
Sir Thomas Grey; 1st Marquis of Dorset (1455 – 1501)
Son of Elizabeth Woodville; Queen Consort to Edward IV of England
Thomas Grey 2d Marquis of Dorset (1477 – 1530)
Son of Sir Thomas Grey; 1st Marquis of Dorset
Katharine Grey
Daughter of Thomas Grey 2d Marquis of Dorset
Lady Joanna Jane FitzAlan (1537 – 1578)
Daughter of Katharine Grey
Thomas Lumley (1560 – 1626)
Son of Lady Joanna Jane FitzAlan
Elizabeth LUMLEY (1585 – 1632)
Daughter of Thomas Lumley
Sgt. Thomas Edward Barber (1612 – 1662)
Son of Elizabeth LUMLEY
Mercy BARBER (1651 – 1725)
Daughter of Sgt. Thomas Edward Barber
Samuel GILLETT (1677 – 1739)
Son of Mercy BARBER
Samuel GILLETT (1702 – )
Son of Samuel GILLETT
John G GILLETT (1732 – )
Son of Samuel GILLETT
Charles GILLETT (1765 – )
Son of John G GILLETT
Eunice GILLETT (1791 – 1862)
Daughter of Charles GILLETT
Barton R KEECH (1823 – 1856)
Son of Eunice GILLETT
Hiram KEECH (1851 – 1926)
Son of Barton R KEECH
Harold Leroy KEECH (1891 – 1965)
Son of Hiram KEECH
Private Keech
|
Living Moore
Myself
 
P.S. Each of us has over 65,000 17th Great grandparents, so if you are of English/European descent, the likelihood that you too are related to one of these European nobles is pretty high!

Winnifred Stevens / Stephens 1802

MOORE FAMILY OF LANARK COUNTY ONTARIO 1830s – UPDATE!

After connecting with a DNA relative Scott Moore, he sent me a digital copy of our common 3rd great-grandmother, Winnifred Stephens 1802, wife of William Moore 1800, both of Maberly, Ontario, who both emigrated from Ireland around 1829 to build a life in soon to be Canada.

This photo had written on the back of it, “Winnifred Stevens”. It is so wonderful to finally see her face! She is after all, one of The Women Who Made Me.

Winnifred Stevens 1800 of Maberly, Ont., provided by Scott Hansen Moore of U.S., descendent of David Moore, 4rth cousin, Familysearch.org https://www.familysearch.org/tree/pedigree/portrait/L268-KGP

Winnifred Stevens (1800), wife of William Moore

b. Mar 1802 Ulster, Ireland

d. March 6, 1874, Maberly, Lanark County, Bathurst Twp, South Sherbrooke, Ontario.

Children: Thomas, Mary Jane, Richard, Frances, David, John, Charles, Henry.  

Her first husband William Moore (about 1800 unknown origin in Ireland) died early before 1852 likely due to harsh conditions, leaving her with many children and a farm to raise. She remarried a Thomas Garrett as most women would do at the time, and died in 1874 at the home of her son, John Moore.

This Methodist pioneering matriarch was known by her peers as “an angel on earth” for helping her neighbours in times of need, specifically, saving a woman in childbirth on a cold winter’s eve.

God Bless Winnifred!

Thank you to Scott for providing this picture and his family’s research, adding another missing branch from our Moore tree!

If you have additional information, please write in the comments. Thank you.

Luck of the Irish! AncestryDNA Results

Well, the verdict is in. I’m Irish. After waiting for 3 weeks, my AncestryDNA results arrived via a message from an AncestryDNA Relative who is definitely a 3rd cousin, on my father’s side from the Palmer/Boyles line.

But the most exciting thing was seeing the chart below and having to do a double take on the ethnicity percentages:

Screen Shot 2017-07-06 at 3.42.55 PM

I’m not only Irish, I’m 57% Irish!  I thought that would be impossible, that my father’s side who had both Irish and English roots would dissipate my results to maybe 23% if I was lucky, but it turns out I’m IRISH Lucky – over half! And that’s an average. Some of my DNA strands or markers tested as high as 71% Irish, while others were a lower 41%.  So I’m “above average” Irish at 57% and quite happy to see my Irish roots declared in writing based on scientific evidence.

Here is a more detailed breakdown:

Screen Shot 2017-07-06 at 4.10.28 PM

(Note: Europe West includes German/France/Netherlands and Scandinavia includes Norway, Denmark and Sweden.)

Also astonishing was that I had about 18% French/German and over 17% Scandinavian! My Norse roots may come through my mother’s Scottish line, as the Anderson/Andersen  clan may have come over with the Vikings. These are also averages, and can be lower or higher depending on the DNA strand/marker they are testing.  For example, Scandinavian tested anywhere between 1% to 33% depending on the strand/marker; the average helps us know overall just “how much” of our genetic make-up is from that region overall.

My motivation for doing all of this was to find my Irish ancestors and living cousins. I have already found many potential cousins, and I am quite amazed how AncestryDNA has managed to match them to my family tree on ancestry.com with specific matching surnames and in some cases actual common ancestors.

This is the beginning of a beautiful friendship… And, this will make my Moore “plus” family reunion a whole lot bigger!

It feels good to be Irish.

Thanks AncestryDNA!

Krista

DNA May Solve Family History Blocks

Hello everyone!

It has been almost 3 years since my last confession! Seriously, it just tells you how time flies when doing family history research. I hit a roadblock in my search for the Moore Family, and kind of put it aside.

Just this spring, I decided to have my DNA test done with ancestry.com and am now awaiting the results.

In the meantime, it is important to follow the trail. I have reached out to 3 possible cousins so far that found me via ancestry, one in Ireland, one in Australia and another here at home, only a stones throw away.

Next is a family reunion. Perhaps that will pull us all together, and reveal some threads that have long been awaiting completion.

I will let you know as soon as the results are in!

Krista

More on Mary Beaton Mi’Kmaq (micmac) Nfld

In my wondrous “exploits” in my mother’s “native” home, Botwood, Newfoundland, I discovered something I never thought or even imagined in my family line. Aboriginal blood. But not just that – a tie to history so strong, so foreign to my North American, 5th generation sensibilities, that it broke through the barrier of my very idea of myself.

IMG_3456

Krista Moore & mother Mary Moore (Hart) along Exploits, Nfld

Gerald "Bud" Beaton & my mother Mary Moore (Hart)

Gerald “Bud” Beaton & my mother Mary Moore (Hart)

Mixed Feelings on Learning the Truth

What does it mean to be part Mi’Kmaq or native?  Apparently, many previous generation Newfoundlanders were ashamed of finding any native connection, and strove to hide it from their progeny, even going so far as to destroy family history documents (my mother not included in that mixture).

Now, perhaps due to more enlightened and inclusive times, or the Canadian government’s offering the with native heritage status and benefits, the next generation cousins have come forward to label themselves most proudly with this new reality of being “part native”.  It seems we have not only come to terms with, but embrace the idea of our Mi’Kmaq heritage. And perhaps, ironically, are a little ashamed of our British ancestors for so brutally placing themselves in the midst of a great people, and obliterating most if not all of the Beothuks in the process.

Who are the Mi’Kmaq?

micmac

The Mi’Kmaq are a First Nations indigenous people from the Canadian Maritime provinces and Gaspé peninsula of Quebec, distantly related to the Algonquin.  The Beothuk were have related DNA to the Mi’Kmaq, though they treated each other as separate, and were sometimes antagonistic to each other.

In the times when Mary Beaton lived, the early 1800s, both tribes were either in conflict with the British invaders, sometimes stealing their goods, or learned to become allies and helpers of the British in order to trade for weapons and other instruments, while teaching the British how to trap, survey, survive and master their new environment.

I am not an expert on Newfondland history, and so I write this from a purely ignorant but interested third-party “mainland” perspective, one who is tied by genetics, and is somewhat dependent on local hearsay or legend.

The Legend of Mary Beaton & The Last Beothuk

Mary Beaton, as far as we know, was a young Mi’Kmaq girl “who belonged to no one” and became a servant (willing or unwillingly?) in Captain John Peyton Jr.’s house during the 1820s, when the British were having troubled relations with the Beothuks, along the Exploits River in Newfoundland.  Captain Peyton Jr., a magistrate, was trying to “make good” on some of the injustices and poor publicity caused by his father John Peyton Sr.  Many intermarried as they were taken in by the European settlers, including our Mary Beaton to my great great great grandfather, James Gill of Dorset, England.

Shawnadithit Nancy - The Last Beothuk

Shawnadithit Nancy – The Last Beothuk

 

One thing we do know, according to Mary Beaton Gill’s own son, John Henry Gill, who was interviewed in a book entitled:  “River Lords, Father and Son: The Story of the Peytons and the River Exploits, 2nd ed.” by Amy Louise Peyton, his mother Mary would read to her children on cold nights about the time she spent in Mr. Peyton’s house as a servant with one of the last Beothuks, “Shawnadithit Nancy”, another aboriginal young woman, who was captured and saved during an altercation with her tribe in which one man was shot and another, her aunt, Demasduwit “Mary March” died shortly after capture.

Mary then married James Gill in the early 1830s, and they had their first child, Charles Beaton Gill, my great great grandfather around 1830 in Kite Cove, Newfoundland. Seven more Gill children followed.

Charles Beaton Gill, b. 1830, Newfoundland

Charles Beaton Gill, b. 1830, Newfoundland

Legend & Proof

Recently, two pictures surfaced on the internet which have not been confirmed to be Mary and James Gill. However, I include them here to stimulate the imagination, and provoke further study and correction or confirmation. If you have any information on the origin of these pictures, or any other relevant documents, please forward to me using the Contact tab above.

James Gill apparently 1799 to 1869 Nfld source %22Susan Gill Family Tree%22 Ancestry

 

Attributed to James Gill of Newfoundland, b. 1799 in Wimborne, Dorset, England, d. Newfoundland. m. Mary Beaton. Unconfirmed origin and likeness.

 

 

Possibly Mary Arder Gill aka Mary Beaton from %22Susan Gill Family Tree%22 Ancestry

 

Attributed to “Mary Arder Gill”, an incorrect name and possibly mistaken for a woman in Virginia. However, I provide it here for those who know and those who don’t know to decide if this is Mary Beaton who married James Gill above.

 

 

That’s all for now, folks!

 

Enjoy your speculations and discoveries, as we continue our journey into unknown territory, the blending of cultures and the reconciliation of our identities and origins.

 

Amen!

 

Krista Moore

Published in: on December 14, 2015 at 12:26 am  Comments (4)  

How the Past Can Heal Us

Krista in front of oldest tree in Maberly, where Morrow Hotel once stood.

Krista in front of oldest tree in Maberly, Ontario

It occurs to me that in family tree hunting we sometimes forget the most important things: story.  After all these years I have to ask myself, someone trained to live in the present, why going back so far to people who lived before me, who perhaps share some remote traces of my DNA, matters.  What is it that draws me to them, and arguably them to me?  What makes them eternal in my mind, and connects me to their story?  And why does the mystery of what we do not know tantalize us so, so that we never give up wanting to know more?

Funny enough, I am also trained through my hypnosis practice to study and explore past lives – I mean mine, not someone else’s – what some would call reincarnation.  You may not believe in such a thing, and it may go against your spiritual or religious beliefs – or perhaps you believe we are here for a good time, not a long time, and that’s it – dust to dust.  End of story.

Then why the insatiable curiosity?  Whether it be past lives through our ancestors or past lives through our own subconscious or “superconscious” (higher) mind or cellular DNA memory, what links us all together and makes the past come alive – makes US come alive with questions, with desires, with feelings?  Why do we cry when we hear about a hardship our ancestors suffered, or a good story ending in triumph or reconciliation?  It seems I am asking more questions than offering suggestions, but give me a moment.

These questions answer themselves.  The fact is, we do want to know.  Not everyone, to be sure.  Some people may rightly feel that to look back is to get lost in the past. And some may simply not want to hear what might trouble them in the present.  But those who do ask, have a burning desire to know not just for the sake of a good story, but because it tells them something about themselves.  It answers the question: Who Am I? and Why am I here?

If we can look at our lives or the lives of others in retrospect, we see patterns, shapes, stories.  We see parallels.  We see PURPOSE.  And we see PROMISE.  We understand that hardship and suffering can be followed by breakthroughs, and that even death does not stop life from continuing on – we are evidence of that.

Our past stories are collective. What a prominent psychologist, Carl Jung called “the collective unconscious”.  Everything that has ever happened to anyone, and all its apparent meanings, is held there – along with all the wisdom and “knowings” that sometimes  cannot be explained by our current, more limited thinking.  These pieces, these stories have a common source, a common thread through human history, through human consciousness.  It doesn’t matter the time or the place – we find ourselves in its reflection.

Once a year I follow the popular American TV show (now on TLC) “Who Do You Think You Are?” – featuring prominent Americans (mostly celebs) who want to discover something about their ancestry, and the origins of their family.  Notice, the show title is not, “Who Do You Think They Are?”  but rather “Who Do You Think YOU Are.”  Because their tears, their AHAs, their curiosity, and their sense of compassion and forgiveness is not only about their ancestors – it reaches across time and teaches them something about themselves – and even goes so far as to heal their own sense of self, history, story.

We all have a personal destiny, and we want to know that not only will we survive, but that our story will teach those who follow us – it will outlive us – extend us – “eternalize” us.

The truth is, we are already eternal.  But while we are sloshing around here on earth trying to make a living, learning lessons and putting up with the hardships and trials, heartbreaks and breakthroughs – it helps to know that someone will be staring back at us through time and saying, “Wow! I’m really glad so and so lived…  How brave he/she was, how honest, how strong, how compassionate… I want to be more like that.”

When we look back, we want to emulate the best we see, and forgive the worst.  Because when we can do that, we become the greater part of history, we become an extension of it, fulfilling its ultimate purpose – not only to tell a good story, but to teach how to live a good life.   And so we become the living proof of what it means to us, what it offers us, and to our kids and grandchildren.  We are its living, breathing, connections that link past present and future in one eternal loop.

And even as audience, witnessing someone else’s history, we see ourselves – beyond family blood barriers, beyond time itself.  We can identify meaning and purpose without any regard to dates and names.  Those provide the colour and fabric, the identity so to speak.  But the picture is worth more than its parts. One human family struggling to live – and learning to really LIVE – one lesson, one story, one life at a time.

Happy journeying.

 

Krista