My Irish Blood

After many years of searching for my Irish ancestry, I have many names, but fewer places. Without visiting Ireland, and connecting with flesh and blood relatives here and abroad, my trail grows stale.

It’s time to be Irish, and not pursue.

Ireland explains my poetic, lyrical nature, my love of Celtic music, my father’s wicked sense of humour, my flash of temper, good looks (hey!), and dreamy love of the coastal worlds and spirit worlds, the “thin places” of my homeland within. I can’t escape it. It is as near to me as my nose!

Rather than try to find my Irish roots, I am becoming them. Claiming my inner and outer reality, not by DNA, not by the relatives I have found, nor the hypothetical places I have traced with my hand on a screen leaning over books too long. No, Ireland has been with me all along.

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My heart sings and my imagination dreams,

The romantic singer, free bourne spirit leaping and dancing

The marvellous look on my face when you’ve struck my last nerve

The sound of my feet on the ground, the way they don’t quite touch 

As I am always “somewhere else” eyes far off 

Sounds, plays, movies, foods, music, laughter, cabins in the wood

Stone houses alongside craggy lanes

It’s all me

I haven’t changed a bit!

I will find you one day

Like a dog chasing its tail!

You are mine, you are the beating of my mind and heart

My love of nourishing soul food in teary conversation

Lost in each other’s bright faces

Life! a parade of sparkling waywardness

That always leads me home

Loving, laughing, feeling, smiling,

Tapping, mimicking, greeting, hugging,

Spilling a mug or two

A jig, a halt, a saunter, a milieu

Pubs and sea food

Black ale known as stout and hearty stew

I may eat veg but my soul goes back to the earth  

The fire and the salt and the sweet smell of the hearth

Ah God, you are my distant refuge, and as near as a dear friend to me.

 

Published in: on December 22, 2019 at 4:15 am  Leave a Comment  
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Connecting Moores of Maberly, Drummond, North Elmsley, Carleton Place (Lanark County, Ontario)

Based on a comment submitted to this site, Thatsrelative, by Janet Moore, I’ve realized a connection that binds two Moore branches together: the Moores of Maberly/Perth area, and those of Drummond/N. Elmsley and other related towns in Lanark County, Ontario.

I’ve often wondered about the relation of Thomas Buell Moore (b. Nov 18 1833, Drummond, Ontario). He owned the Tayside cheese factory in 1894 (as per Perth Courier). This establishment employed one or more of my Moores.  Also, Mr Thomas B. Moore was Township clerk in 1899 (Perth Courier), another occupation shared with my 3rd great-grandfather Thomas Moore, Esq.(b. abt. 1829 Ireland) of Maberly, who was also Reeve of the Township.

Further research of these families shows that Mr Thomas B. Moore comes from a long line stretching back to Antrim Ireland and also earlier settlers of Massachusetts. My Moore origin is still elusive, though our closest match is Dundonald, Down, Ireland, near Belfast, which is shared with Antrim.

Another family, the Garretts, connect our Moore branches together very nicely and seem to be very close friends. Both families worked together and even married to each other. For example, our Winnifred Stephens/Stevens (b. Mar 1802 Ireland), my 4rth great-grandmother was widowed in the 1850s and remarried a Thomas Garrett (b. Jan 1791 England). This Thomas Garrett’s 2d great-grandaughter Viola Garrett (b. 1893 Ontario) married Kenneth Charles Moore (b. 1900) from this same line of Moores (son of James Samuel Moore (b. 1828 Garrison, Lachine Quebec), son of George William Moore (b. 1780s Furlough, Tullyniskan, Antrim, Ireland as per a family record).

Did you catch all that? It’s not easy to string these families together, but at some point, you have to notice the connections and make inferences. We may not have the pieces all put together, but there seems to be a clear connection binding these families socially if not by blood. Time will tell, and my guess is, DNA will confirm many cousins binding the Moore families of Lanark County (Canada), Ireland and the U.S. once and for all.

 

Herb Moore Carleton Place from Frances Moore bytown.net

Herbert James Moore of Carleton Place photo credit: Frances Moore of the website http://www.bytown.net/moorefamilybyfrances.htm.  The picture is of Herbert James Moore (b. 1888 Ontario), son of James Samuel Moore (b. 1863 North Elmsley) who was the son of the same name, James Samuel Moore (b. 1828 Garrison, Lachine, Quebec), whose father was George William Moore (Antrim).

 

 

 

Winnifred Stevens / Stephens 1802

MOORE FAMILY OF LANARK COUNTY ONTARIO 1830s – UPDATE!

After connecting with a DNA relative Scott Moore, he sent me a digital copy of our common 3rd great-grandmother, Winnifred Stephens 1802, wife of William Moore 1800, both of Maberly, Ontario, who both emigrated from Ireland around 1829 to build a life in soon to be Canada.

This photo had written on the back of it, “Winnifred Stevens”. It is so wonderful to finally see her face! She is after all, one of The Women Who Made Me.

Winnifred Stevens 1800 of Maberly, Ont., provided by Scott Hansen Moore of U.S., descendent of David Moore, 4rth cousin, Familysearch.org https://www.familysearch.org/tree/pedigree/portrait/L268-KGP

Winnifred Stevens (1800), wife of William Moore

b. Mar 1802 Ulster, Ireland

d. March 6, 1874, Maberly, Lanark County, Bathurst Twp, South Sherbrooke, Ontario.

Children: Thomas, Mary Jane, Richard, Frances, David, John, Charles, Henry.  

Her first husband William Moore (about 1800 unknown origin in Ireland) died early before 1852 likely due to harsh conditions, leaving her with many children and a farm to raise. She remarried a Thomas Garrett as most women would do at the time, and died in 1874 at the home of her son, John Moore.

This Methodist pioneering matriarch was known by her peers as “an angel on earth” for helping her neighbours in times of need, specifically, saving a woman in childbirth on a cold winter’s eve.

God Bless Winnifred!

Thank you to Scott for providing this picture and his family’s research, adding another missing branch from our Moore tree!

If you have additional information, please write in the comments. Thank you.