Connecting Moores of Maberly, Drummond, North Elmsley, Carleton Place (Lanark County, Ontario)

Based on a comment submitted to this site, Thatsrelative, by Janet Moore, I’ve realized a connection that binds two Moore branches together: the Moores of Maberly/Perth area, and those of Drummond/N. Elmsley and other related towns in Lanark County, Ontario.

I’ve often wondered about the relation of Thomas Buell Moore (b. Nov 18 1833, Drummond, Ontario). He owned the Tayside cheese factory in 1894 (as per Perth Courier). This establishment employed one or more of my Moores.  Also, Mr Thomas B. Moore was Township clerk in 1899 (Perth Courier), another occupation shared with my 3rd great-grandfather Thomas Moore, Esq.(b. abt. 1829 Ireland) of Maberly, who was also Reeve of the Township.

Further research of these families shows that Mr Thomas B. Moore comes from a long line stretching back to Antrim Ireland and also earlier settlers of Massachusetts. My Moore origin is still elusive, though our closest match is Dundonald, Down, Ireland, near Belfast, which is shared with Antrim.

Another family, the Garretts, connect our Moore branches together very nicely and seem to be very close friends. Both families worked together and even married to each other. For example, our Winnifred Stephens/Stevens (b. Mar 1802 Ireland), my 4rth great-grandmother was widowed in the 1850s and remarried a Thomas Garrett (b. Jan 1791 England). This Thomas Garrett’s 2d great-grandaughter Viola Garrett (b. 1893 Ontario) married Kenneth Charles Moore (b. 1900) from this same line of Moores (son of James Samuel Moore (b. 1828 Garrison, Lachine Quebec), son of George William Moore (b. 1780s Furlough, Tullyniskan, Antrim, Ireland as per a family record).

Did you catch all that? It’s not easy to string these families together, but at some point, you have to notice the connections and make inferences. We may not have the pieces all put together, but there seems to be a clear connection binding these families socially if not by blood. Time will tell, and my guess is, DNA will confirm many cousins binding the Moore families of Lanark County (Canada), Ireland and the U.S. once and for all.

 

Herb Moore Carleton Place from Frances Moore bytown.net

Herbert James Moore of Carleton Place photo credit: Frances Moore of the website http://www.bytown.net/moorefamilybyfrances.htm.  The picture is of Herbert James Moore (b. 1888 Ontario), son of James Samuel Moore (b. 1863 North Elmsley) who was the son of the same name, James Samuel Moore (b. 1828 Garrison, Lachine, Quebec), whose father was George William Moore (Antrim).

 

 

 

Winnifred Stevens / Stephens 1802

MOORE FAMILY OF LANARK COUNTY ONTARIO 1830s – UPDATE!

After connecting with a DNA relative Scott Moore, he sent me a digital copy of our common 3rd great-grandmother, Winnifred Stephens 1802, wife of William Moore 1800, both of Maberly, Ontario, who both emigrated from Ireland around 1829 to build a life in soon to be Canada.

This photo had written on the back of it, “Winnifred Stevens”. It is so wonderful to finally see her face! She is after all, one of The Women Who Made Me.

Winnifred Stevens 1800 of Maberly, Ont., provided by Scott Hansen Moore of U.S., descendent of David Moore, 4rth cousin, Familysearch.org https://www.familysearch.org/tree/pedigree/portrait/L268-KGP

Winnifred Stevens (1800), wife of William Moore

b. Mar 1802 Ulster, Ireland

d. March 6, 1874, Maberly, Lanark County, Bathurst Twp, South Sherbrooke, Ontario.

Children: Thomas, Mary Jane, Richard, Frances, David, John, Charles, Henry.  

Her first husband William Moore (about 1800 unknown origin in Ireland) died early before 1852 likely due to harsh conditions, leaving her with many children and a farm to raise. She remarried a Thomas Garrett as most women would do at the time, and died in 1874 at the home of her son, John Moore.

This Methodist pioneering matriarch was known by her peers as “an angel on earth” for helping her neighbours in times of need, specifically, saving a woman in childbirth on a cold winter’s eve.

God Bless Winnifred!

Thank you to Scott for providing this picture and his family’s research, adding another missing branch from our Moore tree!

If you have additional information, please write in the comments. Thank you.

Luck of the Irish! AncestryDNA Results

Well, the verdict is in. I’m Irish. After waiting for 3 weeks, my AncestryDNA results arrived via a message from an AncestryDNA Relative who is definitely a 3rd cousin, on my father’s side from the Palmer/Boyles line.

But the most exciting thing was seeing the chart below and having to do a double take on the ethnicity percentages:

Screen Shot 2017-07-06 at 3.42.55 PM

I’m not only Irish, I’m 57% Irish!  I thought that would be impossible, that my father’s side who had both Irish and English roots would dissipate my results to maybe 23% if I was lucky, but it turns out I’m IRISH Lucky – over half! And that’s an average. Some of my DNA strands or markers tested as high as 71% Irish, while others were a lower 41%.  So I’m “above average” Irish at 57% and quite happy to see my Irish roots declared in writing based on scientific evidence.

Here is a more detailed breakdown:

Screen Shot 2017-07-06 at 4.10.28 PM

(Note: Europe West includes German/France/Netherlands and Scandinavia includes Norway, Denmark and Sweden.)

Also astonishing was that I had about 18% French/German and over 17% Scandinavian! My Norse roots may come through my mother’s Scottish line, as the Anderson/Andersen  clan may have come over with the Vikings. These are also averages, and can be lower or higher depending on the DNA strand/marker they are testing.  For example, Scandinavian tested anywhere between 1% to 33% depending on the strand/marker; the average helps us know overall just “how much” of our genetic make-up is from that region overall.

My motivation for doing all of this was to find my Irish ancestors and living cousins. I have already found many potential cousins, and I am quite amazed how AncestryDNA has managed to match them to my family tree on ancestry.com with specific matching surnames and in some cases actual common ancestors.

This is the beginning of a beautiful friendship… And, this will make my Moore “plus” family reunion a whole lot bigger!

It feels good to be Irish.

Thanks AncestryDNA!

Krista

DNA May Solve Family History Blocks

Hello everyone!

It has been almost 3 years since my last confession! Seriously, it just tells you how time flies when doing family history research. I hit a roadblock in my search for the Moore Family, and kind of put it aside.

Just this spring, I decided to have my DNA test done with ancestry.com and am now awaiting the results.

In the meantime, it is important to follow the trail. I have reached out to 3 possible cousins so far that found me via ancestry, one in Ireland, one in Australia and another here at home, only a stones throw away.

Next is a family reunion. Perhaps that will pull us all together, and reveal some threads that have long been awaiting completion.

I will let you know as soon as the results are in!

Krista

“Mooreville” Maberly

On our trek to Maberly, Ontario, our local host Karen Prytula showed us around – by foot. Yes, you can walk most of the Maberly road without getting too tired, in about half an hour. However, you can’t take everything in, the sights, the sounds, the whispers of old, in less than that. It takes time after time, memory even.

Eventually, it sticks to you like meat to the bone, until stories take shape out of sticks and stones.

Maberly Town Hall, South Sherbrooke  1884

Up on the wall of Town Hall we find the “Reeve’s cane”, with my great-great grandfathers, Thomas Moore, Esq, and Ephraim Deacon Esq. (unbenownst to them at the time, their son and daughter later married). I could see Thomas Moore now, likely six feet tall (his son Lawrence was 6′ 4″ with attitude) with a dignified walking stick, and Ephraim twisting his moustache as the meeting was called to order.  Thomas takes the Chair’s seat, listens and reviews many decisions that will be made in forming the future of South Sherbrooke, from the early 1860s to the late 1880s.

Reeve’s Cane, Town Hall, Maberly

See More on Maberly Moores.

Published in: on August 22, 2013 at 5:15 pm  Comments (4)  
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More on Maberly Moores

Since my last visit to Maberly, Ontario (near Perth), much has been brewing with local history buffs helping to put together information for the 200th Anniversary of South Sherbrooke (now Tay Valley Township) coming up in 2014.

PRESERVING LOCAL HISTORY OF MABERLY

We are currently investigating the original Wesleyan Methodist chapel that was built on Conc. 10 Lot 14 of S. Sherbrooke and a petition that was signed by local residents in 1852, including Thomas Moore Esq. (later magistrate/Justice of Peace/Reeve) and many of the early settlers of that area.  This chapel and old burying ground is no longer visible, but we are cooperating with local families to research and locate the original location of these sites and preserve what we can of local history.

More photos from our last trip.

List of Reeves, South Sherbrooke Town Hall, Maberly

Reeve’s walking stick; List of Reeves, South Sherbrooke Town Hall, Maberly including Thomas Moore and Ephraim Deacon

Bethel (Maberly) Women`s Institute, a picture of the Maberly Hotel

Bethel (Maberly) Women`s Institute, a picture of the Maberly Hotel. See pic below for the same tree beside the hotel, still standing.

Krista in front of oldest tree in Maberly, where Morrow Hotel once stood.

Krista in front of oldest tree in Maberly, where John Morrow’s Maberly Hotel stood.

We visited Town Hall where my forefathers, both Thomas Moore Esq., Reeve, and Ephraim Deacon, Reeve, served on council for many years, and many of their descendents.  Thomas Moore Esq. was also a local magistrate or Justice of the Peace to the King, and must have been sworn in at some point by the Lieutenant Governor General.  Magistrates were put in place in local towns in the new British colonies to settle local disputes outside of the larger courts.  He was not likely a lawyer, but a loyal servant who was passionate about politics, justice and local law.  He fought to preserve the original Weleyan Methodist Church and old burying ground, in a signed petition with his fellow settlers and trustees of the church.

Here we are on the land that William Moore worked with his father, originally owned by Thomas Hughes and later requested to be deeded to Robert Hughes.  It is where the Zealand Rd meets the now Trans Canada Highway, Highway 7, constructed in the late 1940s/50s.  The lines of the land have changed, so locating the original burying ground has been a challenge. The land is now occupied by a modern house with new owners.

New highways divide the land once inhabited by the Moores and Wesleyan Methodist church.

Karen and Steve discuss where the old landmarks may be on the 1860s map to modern day Tay Valley Township

IMG_1192

New highways divide the land once inhabited by the Moores and Wesleyan Methodist church

Here is a letter of petition the old inhabitants wrote to protect the Wesleyan Methodist church and old burying ground on this property:

Original petition to save Wesleyan Methodist church and old burying ground, Maberly, undersigned Thomas Moore et al

Original petition to save Wesleyan Methodist church and old burying ground, Maberly, undersigned Thomas Moore et al

“Petition 0526”, Township Papers, Township of SHERBROOKE SOUTH, Microfilm Series C-IV, Archives of Ontario, copy: June 2, 2010, transcribed by Krista Moore September 21, 2011.  (Describing petition of Church trustees for Wesleyan Methodist Chapel and burying ground on south South-East Lot 14 Conc. 10 S. Sherbrooke, Oct 14th 1856.)

Transcription:

[marks: 10.165 /slash 58]

To Anthony Leslie Esqr    Agent for the

Sale of Crown and Clergy Lands [v mark] at Perth in

The County of Lanark.

[Petition: 0526]

We the Undersigned respectfully state for your

consideration that on the south part of the South East

half of Lot No. 14 in the 10th Concession of South Sherbrooke

there is a plot of ground used as a burying ground

that on a part of this plot or contiguous to it there has

been a Wesleyan Methodist Chapel erected and in [our?]

[start?] occupancy and use for public worship for more

than twelve years. The undersigned Settlers in the nei

ghbourhood of said Chapel and burying ground re-

{ spectfully request that in the event of the said lot being

{ sold that at least two acres be preserved for the use of a

Wesleyan Methodist Church and burying ground

or not deeded  to any [purchaser ]  except to trustees du-

ly appointed whose names shall forthwith [was? Some or seem as] prac-

ticable be forwarded to you and through you to the land

granting department.

South Sherbrooke Oct 14th 1856

[signed by:]

Abrah Adams                                }    Malcom Morrow

Robert Lewis                                  }   John Chambers

John Buchanan                               }    William Armstrong

George Buchanan                          }    Charles Judge

Thomas Moore                               }    Da[vid or Daniel?] Conboy

George Buchanan                          }     John Armstrong

Wm Charlton                                 }     John Duffy

William Morrow

[along right margin:]

John Morrow

The now Maberly United Church:

IMG_1072

Krista beside the now Maberly United Church. Below an embroidered picture hanging in the local bar and grill on Highway 7.

IMG_1089

Finding My Native Roots in Mary Beaton of Exploits, Newfoundland

Hello all!  (Updated Dec 2019)

It has been quite some time since my last communication.  I have opened up my mother’s side of the family now, moving from Moores in Ireland, to the Gills and Beatons in Dominion Point, Exploits, Newfoundland.

There is a Native Canadian (Mi’kmaq) connection to my 6th Great Grandmother, Mary Beaton b. between 1795-1815 in Exploits Burnt Island Nfld, mother of Charles Beaton Gill, wife of James Gill, and a servant in Captain PEYTON’s house with the last Beothuk SHAWNADITHIT (“Nance April”), and her granddaughter, Sophia Ellen Gill (b. July 8, 1859, Peter’s Arm, Newfoundland), who had a son, Nathaniel Gill, adopted by Charles and Mary Ann Hart of Botwood, Newfoundland.

Mary Beaton’s son, my 3rd Gr-Grandfather: Charles BEATON GILL b. 1832 Kite Cove/Exploits, Nfld d. 1887 Botwood Nfld

Looking forward to a chat with my mother and Aunt Daphne “Down Home” for some good old legend mixed with fact. (Dec 2019 Family update: This trip to Newfoundland occurred in 2012, Aunt Daphne died this year 2019, and I will be putting out some of her and her sister Jean’s wonderful tales in the coming year).

Dec 2019 DNA Update: DNA evidence now supports our indigenous roots in Mary Beaton, on my mother’s side. Her brother tested positive 0.1% as well as a cousin on her father’s side, both direct descendants of Mary Beaton, their 5x Mi’kmaq Great Grandmother. 

Krista Moore

“That’s Relative!” – Finding Yourself in Your Family Tree.

Dear Thomas – Part III

Fictional letter to the late Thomas Moore from his 3 x Great Grand daughter, Krista Moore…

I also have been meaning to ask you about Dr. Thomas Moore in Picton. I reckon you had some relationship, whether kin or not.  And his daughter, Catherine Ann Moore, who appears to be a cousin of yours.  It is the only sense we can make of the land transactions in the 1870s when times were difficult and you had to parcel off your land.  I don’t understand such things, but I can see that you lost quite a bit, and that your family cared deeply for you enough to try to keep it in the family.

What happened to your late brother John?  I can’t believe he died 4 days before you at the age of 46. What a heartbreak it must have been, a real blow, that possibly ended your life as well.  I can’t even begin to understand what happened, or why he was buried in Laidley (that is what we call it now), the cemetery where most of the Buchanans are buried, as they are still in charge of it (you’d be happy I think to know.).

John Moore, buried same day as his brother Thomas, Jan. 1887, Laidley cemetery, Maberly, Ontario

I have a friend there named Karen P. who has gone so far as to clear the tombstones of John Moore and M.W Moore, whose tombstones were quite broken and fallen back. She cleared and trimmed the tiger lilies from dear John’s grave, and put M.W. upright again. I guess she was a young daughter or niece of his or Henry’s.   But… what happened to you, dear Thomas?  Buried on the same day? It was winter was it now?  Where?  Can your family help me with this? Perhaps Margaret or your surviving relatives made a decision based on the two children you lost, and buried you with them?  I cannot say. But we also have a relative down by Rokeby named Karen Moore I believe who comes from a Harry Moore of not too long ago?  And she may have something to say about it. She still lives there, and used to live on the land your father William lived on.  I was quite happy to hear it. It is still in the family after all!

There are fireworks going off outside, as it is Queen Victoria day tomorrow. Can you believe it? So much for your George! Now we have Elizabeth II who is in her 90s, the longest standing monarch. Following her will be Charles and Camilla, and then his son William and Catherine. They were quite something when they came to Canada last summer. She is gorgeous and William simply glowed at her side.

Will & Kate, 2011

 

Sir John A MacDonald, 1st Prime Minister of Canada, contemporary of Dr. Thomas Moore of Picton and Thomas Moore, Esq. of Maberly, Oso-Frontenac, Ontario

Which brings me to you and your political career. Did you have a meeting with John A. MacDonald in the 1860s over the railway being extended from Kingston to Pembroke? I believe it was in the summer, a June day, and you were presiding in council, or had a private meeting, as you were Reeve of both Oso and Frontenac at the time. Your own son, Lawrence ended up a road-master on the Railway in Haileybury.  He died shortly after the fire of 1922, of Bright’s Disease, at Wellesley private hospital in Toronto.

Back to “Sir” John A. as we call him… See Historical Matters: Famous Moore Clash with Sir John A MacDonald

 

 

Dear Thomas – Part II

A fictional letter to the late Thomas Moore of Maberly from his 3 x Great-Granddaughter, Krista Moore…..

Do you remember the Deacons?  Do you remember old Ephriam and Ellen? And the Deacon farm? Did you visit often?  Did you two ever have a match of wits, and who decided to accept the role of Reeve first?  Was it you?

The Deacon Farm, Bolingbroke 2011

You were likely a fairly ambitious young man.  I  noticed you were a councillor very early on, and you took the charge as a young magistrate as well, and you, along with the other pioneering churchmen, fought for the little church on your father William Moore and later Robert Hughe’s land. I’m not sure what the picture was like at the time, or who was fighting for whom, but your name was on everything! So I can only assume it was very important to you.

Petition to save Wesleyan Methodist church, Thomas Moore Esq. et al. circa the 1850s, Maberly, South Sherbrooke

What was that first little Wesleyan Methodist church like? Do you remember it now? Could you describe it to me?   If you were here, or I could hear you, I could imagine you saying it was quite dim inside, the logs were quite heavy and dark, and the place was quite stark. It was good enough for the purpose it served at the time. Certainly not an elaborate testament to God or King.  But, it would do for a little chapel in the woods.  I wonder who attended, and what they wore, I wonder who descended upon it, and the little wagons pulling up or going through the lane-way on your father’s land. Maybe it was different then and the church wasn’t where I imagined it at all. Perhaps I got it all wrong.

log cabin church in ontario

What a log cabin church might have looked like in 1840s Ontario.

You see, we only have an 1880 map of the area, and the roads have changed since then. I’m sure if you stood where your house was now, you would be quite alarmed to see a paved road running through, and a big white house standing where your father’s log cabin used to be. Or perhaps you would be standing in a thicket and nothing would be there. Or, perhaps, you would stumble down the lane-way, the very stony lane-way I saw on your father William’s land, where I could see his wagon and horses coming through, to the open patch of land where I imagined his crops were, or his cows grazing, or oxen pulling and tilling the hard earth…

The new lane-way up to the old William Moore farm, Maberly, 2011, Conc 10, Lot 14

Maberly has changed quite a bit since you first lived there.  But I imagine your face would light up to see some of the buildings and houses still in place, like the old general store, now boarded up, but the backroom still open and the old shelves still there and the same old door.  The river Tay runs behind it, and where once was an old mill I believe. I can’t remember if we had a hand in that at all, or just the Deacons, and the Morrows. You tell me!  I imagine though, you had to do something with all that wood you cut down on your properties. I feel so ignorant as to your lifestyle and what it meant to live at that time. What you men went through, clearing your land and building structures that were liveable enough for your ever-widening brood.

End of Part II

Continued in Part III

Dear Thomas – Part I

A Fictional letter to the late Thomas Moore of Maberly, from his 3 x Great Grandaughter, Krista Moore…

 

Dear Thomas,

This is your great-great-granddaughter, Krista Moore, writing to you in the year 2012, about a hundred and twenty-five years after you lived. I bet you didn’t know I existed, did you?!  Well, I wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for you and your brave father, William Moore, and your dear mother, Winnifred, who braved even more. So I wanted to thank you for all you’ve done, and braved, and won.  None of us would be here without you.

But more than that, I wanted to apologize for not thinking of you enough when I grow selfish and impatient and ‘want to know more’. My hunger for knowledge has led me to you but has also kept you at bay because I didn’t allow the real story to shine through.  There is so much more to you than historical facts, that I beg your forgiveness for not seeing the miracle of your existence sooner. Now I long to know you as you really were and are. Simply to feel your presence, what you went through, and feel I have come closer to my great-great-grandfather and mother and shared time together, all these years later.

Krista Moore on Thomas Moore land, Maberly

Did I tell you I stood on your land last fall?  I believe this was the land you purchased likely with your own money, because you worked hard for it, that is for sure.  I noticed there was a trailer on it now, and some smaller houses, but most of the land is still there, clear as ever, and your original fence, too. I stood next to it, and Steve, my husband, took my picture. I was holding my book of information, all about you and your children and grandchildren, a little white binder of facts, clinging to my chest. I was proud of you and proud to be standing on a big rock outside the farm that you once knew, and once knew you!   Did you work hard on it, or did you have your sons to help you? Did you hire other help as well? Or did your wife Margaret lend a hand? What about your daughters? Did you see that they were useful as well? Or did they sew and cook and clean inside? I’d love to know more about them as well.

Thomas, I am so sorry about your loss of Margaret and David. I can’t even imagine the pain you must have went through when you lost them. I have a daughter who is 9, and this very night she has a fever and has gone to bed early. In those days, I am pretty sure you did not have children’s Tylenol or a warm bed unless it was the heat of summer. In which case the bugs must have been merciless.  How you bore it, or your child Margaret, when your little Margaret died, and then ten years or so later, David too. Or was it the other way around?  I do not want to report facts to you, because I feel I would be insulting you to pretend to know more about you than yourself. I would rather ask you, and see if I might be surprised, and realize I know very little about you after all. That there is so much more to know, that this is a real adventure we are on, again, in revisiting the past, only to bring my own dear father, John Harold Moore, closer to you, his own great-grandfather. Can you believe it?  He didn’t even get to know his grandfather, your last son, Lawrence, who was lost to his own family at the age of 44. I am sorry to report, but I’m sure you already know.  He too left a whole brood behind him with dear Emma leading the way, a hearty Deacon girl.

End of Part I

Continue to Part II