More on Mary Beaton Mi’Kmaq (micmac) Nfld

In my wondrous “exploits” in my mother’s “native” home, Botwood, Newfoundland, I discovered something I never thought or even imagined in my family line. Aboriginal blood. But not just that – a tie to history so strong, so foreign to my North American, 5th generation sensibilities, that it broke through the barrier of my very idea of myself.

IMG_3456

Krista Moore & mother Mary Moore (Hart) along Exploits, Nfld

Gerald "Bud" Beaton & my mother Mary Moore (Hart)

Gerald “Bud” Beaton & my mother Mary Moore (Hart)

Mixed Feelings on Learning the Truth

What does it mean to be part Mi’Kmaq or native?  Apparently, many previous generation Newfoundlanders were ashamed of finding any native connection, and strove to hide it from their progeny, even going so far as to destroy family history documents (my mother not included in that mixture).

Now, perhaps due to more enlightened and inclusive times, or the Canadian government’s offering the with native heritage status and benefits, the next generation cousins have come forward to label themselves most proudly with this new reality of being “part native”.  It seems we have not only come to terms with, but embrace the idea of our Mi’Kmaq heritage. And perhaps, ironically, are a little ashamed of our British ancestors for so brutally placing themselves in the midst of a great people, and obliterating most if not all of the Beothuks in the process.

Who are the Mi’Kmaq?

micmac

The Mi’Kmaq are a First Nations indigenous people from the Canadian Maritime provinces and Gaspé peninsula of Quebec, distantly related to the Algonquin.  The Beothuk were have related DNA to the Mi’Kmaq, though they treated each other as separate, and were sometimes antagonistic to each other.

In the times when Mary Beaton lived, the early 1800s, both tribes were either in conflict with the British invaders, sometimes stealing their goods, or learned to become allies and helpers of the British in order to trade for weapons and other instruments, while teaching the British how to trap, survey, survive and master their new environment.

I am not an expert on Newfondland history, and so I write this from a purely ignorant but interested third-party “mainland” perspective, one who is tied by genetics, and is somewhat dependent on local hearsay or legend.

The Legend of Mary Beaton & The Last Beothuk

Mary Beaton, as far as we know, was a young Mi’Kmaq girl “who belonged to no one” and became a servant (willing or unwillingly?) in Captain John Peyton Jr.’s house during the 1820s, when the British were having troubled relations with the Beothuks, along the Exploits River in Newfoundland.  Captain Peyton Jr., a magistrate, was trying to “make good” on some of the injustices and poor publicity caused by his father John Peyton Sr.  Many intermarried as they were taken in by the European settlers, including our Mary Beaton to my great great great grandfather, James Gill of Dorset, England.

Shawnadithit Nancy - The Last Beothuk

Shawnadithit Nancy – The Last Beothuk

 

One thing we do know, according to Mary Beaton Gill’s own son, John Henry Gill, who was interviewed in a book entitled:  “River Lords, Father and Son: The Story of the Peytons and the River Exploits, 2nd ed.” by Amy Louise Peyton, his mother Mary would read to her children on cold nights about the time she spent in Mr. Peyton’s house as a servant with one of the last Beothuks, “Shawnadithit Nancy”, another aboriginal young woman, who was captured and saved during an altercation with her tribe in which one man was shot and another, her aunt, Demasduwit “Mary March” died shortly after capture.

Mary then married James Gill in the early 1830s, and they had their first child, Charles Beaton Gill, my great great grandfather around 1830 in Kite Cove, Newfoundland. Seven more Gill children followed.

Charles Beaton Gill, b. 1830, Newfoundland

Charles Beaton Gill, b. 1830, Newfoundland

Legend & Proof

Recently, two pictures surfaced on the internet which have not been confirmed to be Mary and James Gill. However, I include them here to stimulate the imagination, and provoke further study and correction or confirmation. If you have any information on the origin of these pictures, or any other relevant documents, please forward to me using the Contact tab above.

James Gill apparently 1799 to 1869 Nfld source %22Susan Gill Family Tree%22 Ancestry

 

Attributed to James Gill of Newfoundland, b. 1799 in Wimborne, Dorset, England, d. Newfoundland. m. Mary Beaton. Unconfirmed origin and likeness.

 

 

Possibly Mary Arder Gill aka Mary Beaton from %22Susan Gill Family Tree%22 Ancestry

 

Attributed to “Mary Arder Gill”, an incorrect name and possibly mistaken for a woman in Virginia. However, I provide it here for those who know and those who don’t know to decide if this is Mary Beaton who married James Gill above.

 

 

That’s all for now, folks!

 

Enjoy your speculations and discoveries, as we continue our journey into unknown territory, the blending of cultures and the reconciliation of our identities and origins.

 

Amen!

 

Krista Moore

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Published in: on December 14, 2015 at 12:26 am  Comments (1)  

On the Hunt for Mary Beaton Indian Connection

Hello all!

It has been quite some time since my last communication.  I have opened up my mother’s side of the family now, moving from Moores in Ireland, to the Gills and Beatons in Dominion Point, Exploits, Newfoundland.

There may be an Indian (Micmac?) connection to one of my ancestors, Mary Beaton b. between 1795-1815 in Exploits Burnt Island Nfld (possible Mi’Kmaq), mother of Charles Beaton Gill, wife of James Gill, and a servant in Mr. PEYTON’s house with the last Beothuk SHAWNADITHIT (Nancy, Nance April), and her grandaughter, Sophia Ellen Gill (b. July 8, 1859, Peter’s Arm, Newfoundland), who had a son, Nathaniel Gill (later Hart) out of wedlock, who was then adopted by Charles and Mary Ann Hart of Botwood, Newfoundland.

3rd Gr-Grandfather: CHARlES BEATON GILL b. 1832 Kite Cove/Exploits, Nfld d. 1887 Botwood Nfld

Looking forward to a chat with my mother and Aunt Daphne “Down Home” for some good old legend mixed with fact.

More soon….

P.S. Contact me if you have any information.  My VCard can be found under “About/Contact” or go to http://www.kristamoore.com for my other site.

Thanks,
Krista Moore

ie., “That’s Relative!”

Welcome to Maberly

Tay River, Maberly

This past weekend my husband and I ventured to Maberly, Ontario to visit my long-gone relatives: the ancestors I have been researching for nearly 20 years.  Needless to say, it was a quiet visit. But quite reflective, tangible and fulfilling.

Local kids in Maberly

Local kids in Maberly 1950s

Maberly used to be somewhat of a “Mayberry” in its time.  Once a thriving pioneer village of  sawmills, blacksmith’s shops, a general store (or two), school houses, local churches and a town hall (still in operation), and the men’s local tavern – a favourite up until 40 years ago – Today, Maberly is crying out for some reinvention.

Entering Maberly

For sale, Maberly 2011

Although, there is a very good restaurant when you come in to town, the Fall River Restaurant on the corner of Highway 7 and Maberly/Elphin Rd. which officiated our visit with happy taste buds (who would have imagined gourmet Mole chicken pizza in rural Ontario?) and a Guinness, perfect after a dreary day of traveling.

Fall River Restaurant & Gift Shop, Maberly

Our proprietor Ian was the perfect welcoming host, dousing us with a local history (the structure we were standing in used to be the general store), and fascinating me with their awards as the “Greenest Restaurant in Canada”.  In Maberly?  Yup.

Falls Inn Restaurant

“Greenest Restaurant in Canada” – Maberly

Adventures in Maberly

To be continued…

The Women Who Made Me

This is an homage to the “Women who Made Me”, a series of portraits I plan to develop in more depth later. For now, their names, and pictures where possible.  The last 200 years or so of Krista Moore‘s grandmothers… both paternal and maternal, in no particular order, other than time. More pictures and stories to come…

Me

Krista Moore

Born in Kingston, Ontario, same hospital as Bryan Adams (and my father, Jack Moore!). Grew up in Elmira (Birdland) with maple syrup and mennonites, & then Kitchener, Ontario, where I graduated and moved to Toronto in 1999. Mother, actress, writer, and family historian.

Mother – Mary

Mother Mary

My Mother Mary (living). Born in Botwood, Newfoundland. Can play the spoons and guitar at a kitchen parties (good ole down home jig), jives wickedly, loves retro diners of the 50s, Dire Straits “Walk of Life”, and is a recently re-discovered Artist (painter). Also, most perfect mother ever.

Grandmothers

Helen B. Moore (Keech)

 Helen B. Moore (nee Keech) on my father’s side. Born 1918 in Edmonton, Alberta. Married to Earl Lawrence Moore of Kingston, Ont. They celebrated their Golden Anniversary. Died Jan 3, 2012 just shy of 94, Kingston. The one who got me hooked on the family tree. She says, “I’m so glad you caught the bug!”

Matilda Kemp Hart (Anderson)

Matilda Kemp Hart (nee Anderson) (nickname “Bunty”) on my mother’s side, born 1920 in Aviemore, Scotland. Married James Everett Hart of Newfoundland. They celebrated their 50th Anniversary. Died in 2005. “Bunty” was a great baker, I still can smell her “lassie buns”.  A very stern, jolly, strong woman who could drink my father under the table. I wrote a family history for her of Scotland, filled with her stories, and her sister’s stories called “Journey to the Homeland”, 1999.

Great-Grandmothers

Emma Bell Deacon born on the Deacon farm (still there today) in Bolingbroke, Ontario 1876. Married Lawrence E. Moore of Maberly, Ontario.  Lived to 1968 and died in Kingston. My father still remembers her singing those devilish Irish victory songs. Oh boy!  She could play the piano beautifully by ear and the mouth organ.  How I would love to be a fly on the wall of her dining room when they had their rousing jigs!

Isla Isobel Keech (Bagnall) with Helen & Harold

Isla Isobel Keech (my Nanna Keech)born 1897 in Hazel Grove, Prince Edward Island. Married Harold Leroy Keech of Tamworth, Ontario.  Ate her apples right down to the core. Died in Huntsville, Ontario, 1988?  English.

Emily Jewer (Grandma Hart) in Newfoundland

Emily Jewer (my mother’s grandmother), Newfoundland. Never met her, though my mom remembers her Grandma Hart. My Uncle Cyril of Newfoundland just sent me a picture of her, with my “Poppy” Hart, and I believe, my mother Mary.

James Anderson & Mary Dickie Davidson, Scotland

Mary Dickie Davidson (mother of Matilda Kemp Anderson), Scotland. Married to Grandpa James Anderson of Scotland, who lived to 99, and died in Aviemore,  in the Highlands (up the A9). Beautiful church overlooking Loch Alvie. Visiting in 1999. Never met either unfortunately but had a great time with their offspring!

2d Great-Grandmothers

[Picture of Margaret Chambers]

Margaret Chambers born 1833 in Ballydugan, Warringstown, Tullyish Parish, Down, Ireland (one of my many planned visits!). Mother of my great grandfather, Lawrence E. Moore (roadmaster and cheesemaker of Haileybury), wife of my great-great grandfather, Reeve Thomas Moore, Esq of Maberly who lived nearby as she was growing up in Maberly). They had many children. After the sudden death of her husband Thomas and her older son William E. Moore (local merchant), she remarried the local Miller/Hotelkeeper, John Morrow of Maberly, where she died in 1897.  Pictures to come.

Ellen Ann Palmer

Ellen Ann Palmer (mother of Emma Bell Deacon). Married Ephriam Deacon, of Bolingbroke/Maberly. This is a  tintype found in a wooden frame, salvaged from her daughter Emma Bell Deacon (Moore)’s house in Kingston, Ontario.  Likely 1860s, at the age of 15 or so.  May have been a present to Ellen & Ephriam on their wedding day. The Palmers were English, though they married Northern Irish (British).  I have older pictures of her as well, with her family.

Emma Keech (Vannest)

Emma Vannest (mother of Harold Leroy Keech, wife of Hiram Keech of Tamworth.)  My grandmother Helen still calls her “Grandma Keech”, and my father remembers her at the end of her life.  She made the  most delicious pies that my Nanna Moore can still taste. Oh! She would exclaim. She describes her as fairly prim and proper, some called her “Lady Keech”. A true Victorian lady.  Her parents are James Vannest & Elizabeth Shannon – American/Dutch & Irish.

Margaret Jane Bagnall (MacMillan)

Margaret Jane Bagnall (MacMillan)

Margaret Jane MacMillan (mother of Isla Isobel Bagnall). Edmonton, Alberta. My grandmother Helen Moore loved her Grandma Bagnall when she was growing up. I have a feeling she spoiled her!

Sophia Ellen Gill (birth mother of Nathaniel Hart), Newfoundland (English). There’s a story there!

Charles Hart & Mary Ann Waterman, Botwood Nfld

Charles Hart and Mary Ann Waterman (adoptive parents of Nathaniel Bruce Gill/Hart),  Botwood.

Ann Phelan/WHELAN &
James “Jimmie” JEWER Jr.,
Botwood Nfld (1880s)

Anne Phelan/WHELAN (wife of James “Jimmie” JEWER, mother of Emily Jewer/Hart). Possible micmac roots? Investigation in progress.

Jane Angus (mother of Mary Dickie Davidson), Scotland.

3rd Great-Grandmothers

[Picture of Winnifred Stephens]

Winnifred Stephenswas born in Ireland (unknown), and married William Moore (also of Ireland). She had her first son Thomas Moore back home, and then travelled by ship to North America around 1829, landing eventually in Ontario. She and her husband settled a farm in Maberly, South Sherbrooke, Lanark County South, Ontario, on Conc. 10 Lot 14E, and after 1842 her husband died suddenly leaving her with an abundance of children and responsibility. She continued to farm as the “Widow Moore”, until she remarried in the 1860s and moved to Lampton with Thomas Garrett.  She returned by 1870s to Maberly, without him, where she died at the home of her son John Moore in 1874.  A hard life to begin, and to end, I am indebited to her for her bravery and resilience in raising all those children and bearing so much of the weight alone.  God knows what her life was before, but her story continues, as we prepare for the 200th anniversary of South Sherbrooke in 2016, honouring the pioneers who settled it, like my oldest known Irish matriarch, Winnifred Stephens (Moore).

Sarah Ann Harrison (mother of Margaret Chambers), Maberly, Ontario and Ireland.

Mary Harper  (mother of Ephraim Deacon)

Mary Ann Castle (mother of Ellen Ann Palmer)

Caroline Ann Thurston (mother of Hiram Keech)

Elizabeth Ann Shannon

Elizabeth Ann Shannon (mother of Emma Vannest), American/Irish. From Camden, Ontario. Elizabeth died young, cared for by her only daughter, Emma Vannest.  She lost two babies, who are buried in Tamworth with her.

Christiana Anderson (mother of George W. Bagnall)

Isabella McLeod (mother of Margaret Jane MacMillan)

Rebecca Warrick (mother of Charles Hart, believed to be natural father of Nathaniel Hart), Newfoundland.

Mary Dickie (mother of Jane Angus), Newfoundland.

Ellen Unknown Gill (mother of Sophia Ellen Gill), Newfoundland.

Ann Garland (mother of James Jewer), Newfoundland.

4th Great-Grandmothers

Elizabeth “Betsy” Card

Elizabeth (“Betsy”) Card (mother of Elisha Vannest), Likely Quaker.

Mary Margaret McGregor

Mary Margaret McGregor (mother of Elizabeth Ann Shannon)

(Possibly) Mary Jane (Robinson/Henderson). Mother of William Moore. Irish.

Unknown mother of Winnifred Stephens.

Susannah Chambers (mother of Moses Chambers). Ireland.

Unknown mother of Sarah Ann Harrison. Ireland.

Unknown mother of John Deacon, Ireland.

Mary Beaton (mother of Charles Beaton Gill), Newfoundland. b. abt. 1800 Exploits Burnt Island, Newfoundland, possible Mi’Kmaq, servant in Mr. PEYTON’s house along with the last BEOTHUK Indian of Newfoundland, Shanawdhidit (Nancy April) as per the book “RIVER LORDS” by Amy Louise Peyton. More to come!

Isobell Davidson (mother of Robert Davidson), Scotland.

Agnes Muccersie (mother of James Angus), Scotland.

5th Great-Grandmothers

Mary Ellen Boyle (mother of Mary Harper)

Unknown mother of James Palmer (father of Ellen Ann Palmer), Ireland.

Unknown mother of Mary Castle (mother of Ellen Ann Palmer), Ireland.

Eunice Gillett (mother of Barton R. Keech)

more….

6th Great-Grandmothers

Esther Hunter (mother of Eunice Gillett)

Matilda Unknown Thurston (mother of Caroline Ann Thurston)

Janet Sim (mother of William Davidson), Scotland.

more…

7th Great-Grandmothers

Elizabeth Ann Cantelo (mother of Edwin Cantelo Bagnall), England.

Margaret Mutch (mother of Robert MacMillan)

Elizabeth  Whitehouse (mother of John Richard Bagnall), England.

Mary Dix Salmon (mother of Elizabeth Ann Cantelo), England.

Sarah Unknown Bagnall (mother of Samuel E. Bagnall)

Elizabeth Taylor (yes!) (mother of James Cantelo), Isle of Wight, England

Mary Byerly (mother of John Cantelo),

Betty Bartlett (mother of Elizabeth Taylor), England.

Janet Hood (mother of Robert Davidson), Scotland.

8th Great-Grandmothers

Amy Hills (mother of James Cantelo sr.), England.

To be UPDATED continually. Not to be relied upon for accuracy. This is a family history document meant to honour those listed, not to provide accurate details for genealogical purposes.