DNA Update on Native Blood from Mary Beaton, Newfoundland

A very quick update on my DNA results in my mother’s family line from Newfoundland, regarding Mary Beaton, our 5th/6th great grandmother. My uncle tested positive for Native American (more accurately, Canadian-Mi’kmaq) blood on 23andme (an American test), as well as another of my mother’s cousins from the same line (different sibling), all descendants of Mary Beaton.

The trace percentage is consistent with the number of generations to my mother, uncle and cousin (5-6 generations from Mary Beaton, b. around 1800 on Burnt Island, Exploits, Nfld, Canada). Both 23andme and AncestryDNA change their DNA compositions frequently, so a trace percentage can appear and disappear with each rendition.

However, this evidence is good enough for me. Especially when there is no guarantee of inheriting any of the native DNA; that they did shows the legend is founded on truth: my 6th great grandmother Mary Beaton was indigenous, Mi’Maq, and her DNA carried through all the way down to my mother’s generation, however trace.

(I don’t think my mother needed this evidence, as her nature is so close to the land, the trees, the water, that once I had a dream that her spirit name was “Peacewater”).

The second proof of native blood is the book River Lords* that includes Mary Beaton’s son’s comments on his mother’s Mi’kmaq origin, and how she worked at the house of Captain Peyton alongside the last Beothuk, Shanawdidhit.  Please see previous post for more information. Here is a possible picture of Mary Beaton (left) and Shanawdidhit (right), both born around 1800 in the same area, Exploits River, Newfoundland.

What also surprised me about my Uncle’s DNA results were the 8.6% Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France; 0.7% Portuguese; and trace 0.1% North African (with a matching DNA relative in Morocco) – but that’s another story!

*Book ref: Amy Louise Peyton. River Lords, Father and Son: The Story of the Peytons and the River Exploits, 2nd ed. St. John’s, NL: Flanker Press, 2005, ISBN 1-894463-51-X.

 

Published in: on December 22, 2019 at 4:54 am  Leave a Comment  
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Winnifred Stevens / Stephens 1802

MOORE FAMILY OF LANARK COUNTY ONTARIO 1830s – UPDATE!

After connecting with a DNA relative Scott Moore, he sent me a digital copy of our common 3rd great-grandmother, Winnifred Stephens 1802, wife of William Moore 1800, both of Maberly, Ontario, who both emigrated from Ireland around 1829 to build a life in soon to be Canada.

This photo had written on the back of it, “Winnifred Stevens”. It is so wonderful to finally see her face! She is after all, one of The Women Who Made Me.

Winnifred Stevens 1800 of Maberly, Ont., provided by Scott Hansen Moore of U.S., descendent of David Moore, 4rth cousin, Familysearch.org https://www.familysearch.org/tree/pedigree/portrait/L268-KGP

Winnifred Stevens (1800), wife of William Moore

b. Mar 1802 Ulster, Ireland

d. March 6, 1874, Maberly, Lanark County, Bathurst Twp, South Sherbrooke, Ontario.

Children: Thomas, Mary Jane, Richard, Frances, David, John, Charles, Henry.  

Her first husband William Moore (about 1800 unknown origin in Ireland) died early before 1852 likely due to harsh conditions, leaving her with many children and a farm to raise. She remarried a Thomas Garrett as most women would do at the time, and died in 1874 at the home of her son, John Moore.

This Methodist pioneering matriarch was known by her peers as “an angel on earth” for helping her neighbours in times of need, specifically, saving a woman in childbirth on a cold winter’s eve.

God Bless Winnifred!

Thank you to Scott for providing this picture and his family’s research, adding another missing branch from our Moore tree!

If you have additional information, please write in the comments. Thank you.